Skip to main content

About your Search

20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
, of course, a very important word in this administration, transformation. president obama, one of his more famous utterance is is that where five days away from fundamental a transforming the united states of america. that does not sound like pragmatism or like on the logical adjustments to changing circumstances. so, this modest account of liberalism is a form of conservatism and capital truth. in fact to my would suggest it is something more like a noble line meant to protect the actual story of liberalism. add the -- as a political phenomenon american liberalism is almost exactly 100 years old. it emerged in the progressive movement that broke into our politics in 1912, that famous election won by woodrow wilson. liberalism progress, as i have understand it, across american politics in three gray waves that dominated the last century and for convenience sake i will just point to them. the new freedom. that was wilson's administration and program, the new deal, of course, and the great society, of course along with its tragic course, the new left. each wave set out to transform america a
you think you'd be vulnerable. but they were making into security leaks from the obama administration were making us vulnerable. >> what i find disturbing is the following. you read about bossed rove come as you want bring up information about a new kind of favorable. but in this discussion at least, there was no discussion at all that may be the democratic party is for lack of a better word, just as corrupt. well, you all know about the corruption of mr. soros, or at least the monies that he is spending, which you don't even bother to discuss. we know about the corruption of chicago politics and we also know a multi-you the truth. this is an incident, which disturbs me more than anything. when there are bought panthers not allowing white people to go into the in a certain election. it wasn't too long ago, okay? greater moment. so my question is -- all right -- so if you want to question, i will give you a question. why are you not presenting an unbiased view in both respects? you're making him to be the worst person and it's not because corruption exists on the other side as well. >>
of the past four years in the obama administration is how much policy has been driven from the white house. some presidents at least give lip service to cabinet government and empowering their secretaries. obama seems to have gone pretty far the other way. so i'm curious, one, in a second obama term was a continuation of the pattern, and with romney how do you think he would run things in terms of the relationship between the department and the white house? governor. >> i think we've strayed some distance from constitutional government in the sense the white house staff has been built up with layers of folks who kind of cushion the president from the departments and agencies. so i compare and contrast just by being a low-level staffer under reagan on the advanced staff, and seen that the universe of high profile cabinet members who interacted at least from what i can see, more directly with the president. and now we have layers that kind of cushion the president, a deputy chief of staff for policy or whatever the case might be. and i think we're drifting farther and farther away from that
in the court cases that are inevitably coming out of the mandate if it stands, if the obama administration doesn't change, the issues of the definition of religious institutions because there is also the so-called taco bell issue of individual conscience of business owners. what is going to happen in the courts in your respective views? thanks very much. >> you have 30 cases involving 80 plaintiffs. in one sense if the issue doesn't go away for other reasons one short answer is the case ends up in front of the supreme court. you have been a proliferation of cases that variety in the outcomes that you end up with a split. the issue is sufficiently great importance that for one reason or another supreme court will take up one of those cases at some point. it won't be this coming term. it won't be the term after. and it will be determined for that. my prediction is part of the reason why i am enthusiastic. the plaintiffs are going to win on the merits when the merits are reached. i think courts are more inclined to reach the statutory question first and not getting to additional questions --
expeditiously set out to replace repeal and replace obamacare and to undo some other things done by the obama administration. if that works, if it lasts, if republicans don't runway from it, and at the polls in 2014 and 2016, the voters confirm the move then liberal, i think, is in a spiritual crisis. their hold -- to the extend they have the old time religion it's because they believe they're on the right side of history. if history turns against them, then the ground of their confidence is shake. in this respect, it's not unlike communism. a different phenomena. but still, it rests on a kind of marxist confidence that in the end there will be universal revolution and a society and all will make sense. but when they began to doubt that, you know, then the foundations of marxist -- crumbled and even a structure is massive and with as many mega tons as the soviet union disappeared before our eyes. so it's not impossible that liberalism could go poof. en it's unlikely because it has more vitality for something like communism had. it's a lot more democratic, it's a lot more connected to the peop
. sure enough up obama administration finally relented and said it could have the records. it's like pulling teeth. they just ignore the law. and as floridian made some public relations mistakes, yes. they are not trying to deny the vote to anyone. they're trying to make sure the election is honest and has the confidence of the voters. the supreme court has said unanimously regarding an arizona id case, if people don't believe the elections are honest it will lose confidence in the process. voter turnout will go down, and our democracy will be undermined it is a fact of over 40 percent of americans are not confident that their ballots are counted fully or accurately. that is dangerous for democracy, especially since so many other nations counterbalance far better and more effectively and honestly that some of our states to. mexico, was just had an election, being a perfect example. a national id card. the election process is clear, transparent. frankly, no one questioned it after it happened. >> hi. >> asking why so many americans don't vote. what you think that is? >> well, i would
administration that policy and politics are not the same thing. obama will say things like that sometimes. there will be a time to do politics and i am pretty good at politics but others would say it is always time to do politics and that is what you are getting at. two more. in the back. david. >> could you talk a little bit about what you see the role of how the mainstream media covered the stimulus as to how it was received by the american public? did it impact or the polarization that people were going to believe what they want to believe in political reporting in general with respect to how news covers things nowadays? >> i don't care that we are on c-span. the media sucked. they were horrible. i have a lot of fun -- a big file that said gotcha and it started to get relief at. this investigative reporter at usa today, a good investigative reporter but they sit him on the stimulus and i sort of went through everything he wrote. one week he would write stimulus spending too much money in rural areas and the next week stimulus spending too much money in urban areas. then he said it was
.s. catholic of bishops to the obama administration rules and the affordable health care act for contraceptive coverage in such cases. parenthetically, and this is the relevant in the room, both catholics disagree with the school teaching on contraception. >> i am one of those catholics. [laughter] in this case the institution i believe still has religious freedom, but other parties are involved and they have their freedoms, too, their religious freedom, in addition these catholic institutions receive government funding for their operations. so, you have here attention of these different conflicting rights going on here. the rules proposed by the obama administration first say that the church institutions had to provide contraceptive health care insurance for their and please. not only the u.s. catholic bishops, but many other catholics and many other proponents and religious liberty oppose the obama administration and regulation they then propose a compromise that such employees would be covered for contraception but the institution wouldn't have to pay for it. they call that a brilliant solu
the obama administration slowed the growth of medicare spending by $700 billion the big attack of republicans for having done not. in the environment where you can't talk about medicare, where no one would talk about -- everyone is just talking about loophole closes, how do you get from here to there? let me ask doug first. you save the environment would be different in 2013. other than this pressure you talk about for the rating agencies, what is going to get these guys singing to my all? >> they are not going to think oh my god. this environment is the worst, but this'll be the right time to fix it. you don't have to worry about economics not happening. it can be the second word and it's very unlikely that she can't avoid getting it to next year, where i think they're going to be outside pressures. capital market, cutting rating agencies and great leadership out of the white house to get this done. and it's going to be difficult underscored to be lots of days where it's going to look like were going to make it and there's no question about that. we are never very pretty when
on the relationship between the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author examines the recent addition of four justices in the past fife years -- five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, mark. hello, everybody. so excited to be here in philadelphia. you know, i know that's just the usual pandering that goes on by speakers, but in my case it happens to be true. i am not myself from philadelphia, but my dad, jerry toobin, was overbrook high school -- [applause] oh, yeah. the panlderring has just begun, don't worry. [laughter] curtis institute, i don't know if we have any violinists here. and he went to temple as well. [applause] so, you know, and e taught me that -- he taught me that the streets were paved with tasty cake here, and i have enjoyed my visits ever since. [laughter] i would, um, i'm really happy to be talking about the oath today, it only came out two days ago. so far so good. [laughter] and, um, it's, um, it's, you know, it's exciting to -- you
administration stories shifted in all of that and maybe if you don't already like obama, maybe that will help inform your choice of whether to vote for him, but not it seems lately because it's given you the information or the tools to think about what ought to happen in libya or what our policy and let the ought to be to really come to praise and foreign policy coverage as character coverage. i think those categories in a way get confused. you have separated them out, but it's -- or we learned about the world when we read that article or are we learning about whether mitt romney cares about the little guy or about whether obama is brave? i think it is a tricky question because you might indeed get the information that you feel you need to know to vote for this person or that person. but there's also the other little issue about learning about the articles are about more about the actual problems in the world beyond the election might be coming and i don't think that the character thing is negligible. it is important if somebody cares about the little guy. that is crucial about how they see t
for tonight. starting at 7:00 eastern charles kessler examines the obama administration in i am the change. at 8:00 the 77th book awards in cleveland. awards are presented to books that made an important contribution to society's understanding of racism and diversity of human cultures. we conclude with prime-time programming with weekly afterwards program. john jenkins discusses the life of william rehnquist in the partisan with post jon cubic. this is booktv.org with more on this weekend's television schedule. >> booktv's visit to augusta, maine with time warner cable highlight some of the rich literary culture of the area. the city of agusta has evolved from being a trading post in the 1700s to being a magazine publishing hub from the 1800s to the 20th century and also home to harriet beecher stowe, author of uncle tom's kevin. our coverage of the visit continues. >> the only city that actually has a major river and we occupied both sides of the river so we have an east and west side of the river and the river has become a defining point so that is unique. the other thing is what is uniq
. >> there's a question here about something president obama did, which is a stopgap policy, which was essentially to say, my administration is not going to enforce deportation of laws as they pertain to younger immigrants who were born here, a legal immigrant parents commit them to school, have you got in trouble. were not going to deport them. is that a good idea? >> it's absolutely a great idea. politically he was brilliant. romney said of changing his policy are now bidding him. it's a policy that matters. >> the obama administration has supported more undocumented and probably the last five administrations put together. and you would not expect that from a democratic administration. i'm not quite sure why they've been so forceful, but they have been. the people that rupert is talking about is they would carry to age three months in this country and their parents arms. did they break the law? i don't know how it's written, but technically they had no right to come across the border. they did, but in terms of culpability, i mean, come on. these are people were self-selected grou
is about a critique of the obama administration. that is a common topic of calendars. the critiques of the president public foreign policy. there are differences between obama and romney when it comes to foreign policy. those are subsequent. much to the surprise, even some of his own advisers at the time, but rather than backing away from he has continued to emphasize that and say basically that he has emphasize -- emphasize that descending supplies into afghanistan, which has become a significant issue. we're example, >> that is a serious difference. there are others as well. for example, how to stop iran from producing a nuclear weapon. it is not entirely clear. it is pretty hard to tell. >> host: good morning. we have a caller joining us. >> caller: how are you doing? thank you. i definitely agree with the lady talking about the foreign-policy issues. because i think that mitt romney is an opportunist. benjamin netanyahu on foreign policy, obama is actually steadfast -- you know, you talk to benjamin netanyahu on the phone for hours, so it's not like he has been dodging them. he
foundation forum, the u.s. house has done better than the senate for the obama administration. the group also discuss they don't always read the legislation in full before voting for. this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. welcome. minus daniel schuman and i'm the director of the advisory committee on transparency which is hosting today's events. today's discussion is going to focus on whether congress is serious about transparency. we're going to explore the progress that is made up to 100 of congress and identify some of the deficits. we're going to do my portion very quickly because what's really interesting of course is what our general palace have to say. let me start by introducing a. on my right is hugh halpern, staff director for the u.s. house of representatives committee on rules. on the committee serves as chairman david tries chief adviser on committee and leadership that is the to my leftist jim harper, director of information policy studies at the cato institute and is also the founder of washington watchdog, which keeps a very close eye on legislation and federal spending. chim
baby born in term one during the life of the campaign. he's the obama baby. my second baby, i'm digressing, my second son, was born about 120-day mark of the new administration. so we had a lot of stuff going on at home too. and so when i look at it, it's so different. because this time four years ago i had 58 races under my belt. the obama campaign had not one yet this year. i just think that this is really hard work to go -- many of them left for chicago about two years ago. and it's, you know, some people may describe it in the news as a flog. i imagine it is. it's probably really hard to go that long and have that one day at the very end. and i can't imagine, you know, and so that's a difference. i don't know yet. that's there. at this point, you had 58, 57 or 58 tests of us you could see how we were doing. we haven't had that yet for the obama campaign. even romney had races under his belt. we have a sense how the organization is working. i expect it's a tight organization. and i think romney's, you know, has had a lot of the same challenges we had in 2008 than this campa
than the senate or the obama administration making its proceedings more transparent to the public online. that is according to participants of a semi-foundation for an in washington d.c. the group also discussed the fact that lawmakers not only read the legislation of full before voting on it. this is 90 minutes. >> welcome. my name is daniel schuman, director of the advising committee and transparency. today's discussion is going to focus on whether congress is serious about transparency. we are going to beat the one 112 congress and also identify some of the deficits. we are going to do my speaking portion very quickly because it's really interesting is of course a panelist on to say. to mr. for introducing them. on my right is hugh halpern, staff director for the u.s. house of representatives committee and rules. on the committee is served us chief advisor. immediately to my left is jim harper, director of policy studies at the cato institute and also the founder of washington watch.com, which keeps a close eye on legislation and federal funding. jenna sasser to mention washing
] [inaudible conversations] >> now with a look at military operations, ashton carter talked-about the obama administration and strategic shift to the asia-pacific region during his remarks at the wilson center. >> great introduction. more about challis at the moment. thanks to npr and the woodrow wilson center. i just left jane harman for those in the pentagon and she is everything right now secretary panetta, a member of the defense policy board on iran. actually. she wasn't able to be here but she is a wonderful leader at the institution. recognize her as well. mr. ambassador, all members of the diplomatic community are here, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, really wonderful to be here to celebrate the launch of this year's addition of strategic asia. our mission to strengthen the asia pacific policy through research is one that is close to my heart. i share npr's conviction that facts and ideas matter in the public realm. and b are's research helps us understand the world and make decisions within it. for the publications you produce, meetings you convene, scoop jackson would
obamacare trying to investigate the obama administration. and this is exactly what would be predicted. so what we have is separation of parties, not really separation of powers. because when you have unified government, you don't have oversight. and what we need to address is how do we get the benefit of oversight that you do get when you have divided government without paying the immense cost which is the near impossibility -- at least in our time now -- of passing response bive legislation. responsive legislation. >> i just have a question about kind of, like, the amendment process. so, like, our constitution's had hardly kind of any amendments, and some of them are kind of big like the fact i can vote. [laughter] and i just, like, the fact that i can vote, the fact that black people are no longer considered property, those are huge changes to, like, the philosophy of the constitution. and i don't know if they actually, like, even succeed to see how it's even the 14th amendment thing i thought didn't really change things for a long time. do you think that in a new constitution that an a
the romney administration in terms of relations with congress? and with obama in a second term, would he do things differently? or would you suggest to do in terms of congressional relations? >> my sense of president obama as he would learn or at least be instructed by those around him to learn the mistakes of his first term as it relates doing with congress, which i think is a disaster. easier for members of his own party in capitol hill, want to do a deal, want want to strike out, went to get things done, we don't have any real engagement on the part of the president. i think if you want bold initiatives through, you know, as was the case of health care commute out of have something to legislature and say take it. you frame it. you frame 80% of it, try to the legislatures they get it done. there's got to be workable for them. is that too, had, but she's got to frame the outcome of 75, 80% in order to drive it home. and that's the president and the executive branch address it on the bully pulpit. so i think there will be probably some rethinking about the legislative strategy if there is a
opinion for a somewhat stronger american stance vis-a-vis the syrian conflict than the obama administration has thus far adopted. governor romney's speech today is almost certain to raise this point, whether it will raise it in a way that captures the public imagination and strikes them as sensible remains to be seen, but i would say that this survey and governor rom ty's speech -- romney's speech plus developments on the ground may be the entering wedge for what i personally regard as an overdue public debate about what the united states ought to be doing vis-a-vis the syrian conflict. >> bill, thank you so much. um, let me now turn to hisham, and bill talked about the apparent polarization of u.s. public opinion on foreign policy issues. perhaps not surprising four weeks out from a campaign in which foreign policy has suddenly and surprisingly begun to play a significant role in both the campaigns. but what we see in the arab world is with the emergence of more democratic politics, polarization as well. around a number of issues that relate to the relationship, the interact
. as yet what are the noteworthy aspects of the last four years in the obama administration how much policy has been driven from the white house? some presidents give lip service to the cabinet government and in power and their secretaries. obama seems to have gone pretty far the other way. so i'm curious to get a second obama term what we see the continuation of the pattern in which romney, how do you think that he would write things in terms of the relationship in the department and the white house? >> i think we have strayed some distance from the government in the sense that the white house staff has been built up with the lawyers of folks that had to cushion the president from the departments and agencies. sallai compare and contrast just be kind of low-level staffer under ronald reagan on the advanced staff and seeing the universe of high-profile kavanagh members who interjected at least from what i could see more directly with the president and now we have lawyers that kind of cushion the president and the deputy chief of staff of policy or whatever the case might be. and i think tha
about the specifics. you even have a case where the congress and the obama administration slowed the growth of medicare spending by $700 billion, and they're being attacked by republicans for having done that. so, in an environment where you can't talk about medicare, in an environment where no one will talk about base broadeners, everyone talks about loophole closers, how do you, how do you get from here to there? and let me ask doug, first, you said that the environment will be different in 2013. other than this pressure you talked about pro the rating agencies what will get these guys singing kumbayah with each other? >> they're not going to sing kumbayah. i don't want to pretend that they will. this environment is the worst but this would be the right time to fix the fiscal cliff so we don't have to worry about the economics. not happening. lame duck would be the second worst. and for all the reasons i outlined i think it is very unlikely we'll do anything real significant. do the little bit you can to avoid damage and get to next year where, i think they're going to be outsi
the previous administration did in two. and by the way, we have been winning those cases. >> tonight president obama and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. jim lehrer moderates from the university of denver. watch and engage with see them with our life in the brig at 7 p.m. eastern followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate. on c-span2 a multi-camera version of the debate. and following, your reactions, calls, e-mails and tweet. follow our live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. >> ahead of the food and drug administration spoke at a conference on counterfeit prescription drugs. she discussed the new fda initiative to educate consumers, called bsafe our ex. this conference was hosted by the partnership for safe medicine. the fda commissioner's remarks are 20 minutes. >> thank you. it's really a pleasure to be here once again with the partnership for safe medicines. this is a really important topic to me personally and professionally, and really given our shared shared commitment to make our nat
potential implication is that it could prompt for example moscow or in the future even romney or obama or beyond that administration to be able to rethink the commitments without the rest of the world. with that, turn it over to you. >> thank you, travis. i'm here to talk about information warfare. information warfare is important because it crosscuts all the different campaigns that we've been talking about. the land, air and sea in the missile campaign. the chinese it's also important because they view information and the ability to use information and the ability to deny information as the primary or the foundational criteria for whether you win or lose on the battlefield. but before i get to much into the information more for let me talk about the pla concept operations to inform the warfare. the chinese are looking to fight a war that has been called a quick war what resolution. they have looked at let's say the falkland islands and the 1991 operation desert storm and they have come to determine that battles are fought with just one campaign. it's not like world war ii were the of
that administration, i call it administration, but there are some more decisions. and decision to eliminate osama bin laden, i think it was the leadership inaction for president obama to decide to kill osama bin laden. he did the right thing bordering the troops to do it. but 24 hours later there was one leader that condemned the u.s. for killing one of the greatest leaders. do you know who was that leader? which condemned you, the americans? it was the leader of the hamas organization in gaza. the only one who say i am condemning the u.s. for killing a great hero of the arab nation. and on the other hand, why send the troops to kill osama bin laden and the american administration is pressuring israel to sit down and negotiate, but with who? with the same people who praised osama bin laden? with the same people who teach and insight against jews everyday? that is what i think that if we need to get to a point where we have to reach a decision, we cannot allow the palestinian state. or so, i don't know how many of have been to israel but to get from there to hear it is almost crossing israel from east
than the previous administration did. and we've been winning the cases. >> wednesday president obama and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. news hour jim moderates from the university of denver. watch and debate with c-span followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate. and on c-span2, the multicamera version of the debate. and following, your reactions, calls, e mailings and and tweets. follow the live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. see the first presidential debate love on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. watch and engage. coming up tonight, the carnegie endowment for international peace hosts a decision discussion on the role of the u.s. president in the world and declining. eric can ton faces his economic challenger in a seventh district debate. that's followed by libertarian presidential candidate gary johnson on the obstacle of faces a third party candidate. >>> on washington journal tomorrow morning, we'll exam the health care law that presidential candidates mitt romney s
brought more trade cases against china in one term than the previous administration did in two, and, by the way, we have been winning the cases. >> wednesday, president obama and mitt myth meet in the first presidential debate. the newshour jim leher moderates. live with our live preview at 7 p.m. eastern. on c-span, both candidates on screen, the entire debate. on c-span2, the multicamera version of the debate and dpolling, your reactions, calls, e-mailing and tweets. follow our coverage on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span doirgs. >> i have all the channels, house, senate, plus author, book review, speeches, those kinds of things. if i know a bill's coming up on the floor in the house, i watch, you know, which channel i want to see because i have them all. if there's either a speech i know that you've covered or a book review or so on, i'm going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has some value
of different plans to lower lower costs, better quality i believe in competition. obama: if i could just respond very quickly. every study is shown there's lower administrative costs than private insurance does, which is why seniors are generally pretty happy with it. and private insurers have to make a profit. nothing wrong with that. that's what they do. and so, you've got higher administrative costs plus profit on top of that. and if you are going to save any money through what governor romney is proposing, what has to happen is that the money has to come from somewhere. and when you move to a voucher system, you are putting seniors that the mercy of those insurance companies and over time the traditional medicare has decayed or fallen apart, then they are stuck. and this is why the recent aarp has said that your plan would weaken medicare substantially. and that is why they were supportive of the approach that we took it one last point i want to make. we do have to lower the cost of health care. not just in medicare, but overall. romney: that's a big topic. >> moderator: want to get
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)